Interview with James McSweeney

I did an interview with MMA fighter James McSweeney for the Mirror’s online MMA Blog, MirrorTKO.

It’s incredibly in depth and you should all check it out here

Hope all enjoy! Remember to leave some feedback on the site 🙂

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Interview with Statecyde from the CFM regarding the “Get Phil On TV” Twitter campaign

If you haven’t heard about the “Get Phil On TV” twitter campaign, then you’ve obviously been living under a rock for awhile. The campaign was started by our friends the CFM has created a whirlwind twitter campaign to get the NYBA, Phil Baroni on TV for the UFC 125 card.

 

We spoke to Statecyde from the CFM to discuss the twitter campaign, their affiliation with Baroni and the release of “The Album”…

 

 

Nice speaking to you again Tony, congratulations on the album being such a success. There was a lot of buzz around it via twitter, forums, word of mouth etc. How happy are you with the end product?

Thank you. We are all very happy with the finished product. After we initially released “The Album” we got contacted by some very well-known people in the industry that loved the skits/cameos and wanted to contribute. So we’ve got some more great material in store as well when we release the higher quality MP3download for the official iTunes version.

 

Yourself and the rest of the coalition have long history with the New York Bad Ass, Phil Baroni. When was the first time you saw him fight and what drew you and the guys too him specifically as a fighter?

I kid you not; the first UFC fight I saw on American network TV was Phil Baroni vs Dave Menne. It was part of a UFC’s Best KO’s special on SpikeTV. It was easily one of the most impressive wins I had ever seen and left a huge mark on me. Soon after that I started getting into PrideFC and saw that Phil was very successful in Japan as well. The guy had the best walkouts in the biz bar none. So when we came up with the idea of cutting walkout tunes for fighters, getting behind the NYBA was a no-brainer.

I never really had Phil down as a hip hop fan, but he seems to be enjoying it when you guys are freestlying in front of him. What’s it like to have such a legend of the sport really appreciate and enjoy your music?

It’s massive. After we shot the video we were all in the studio going “Man… that’s none other than UFC/Pride Legend Phil Baroni bobbing his head to our stuff!!! “It was pretty much like getting a thumbs up from the Pope lol.


Recently, you and the crew have been involved in a Twitter campaign to have Phil Baroni be on the live broadcast of UFC 125. How did the idea of trying to get Phil on the PPV come about?

Well we had hooked up with Phil at AKA (American Kickboxing Academy) first about him getting on “The Album”. After we got his soundbite we went out for sushi and I told him I had a really strong feeling someone (on the main card) was going to get injured/pull out. I mentioned that we could launch an all-out media campaign (Get Phil on TV) to get his fight with Brad Tavares televised if that was the case. Phil was already aware of the success we had generated with our WWYD skits on MMA Scraps Radio, MMA BeatDown Radio and the UG so he was very open minded about it. I told him all we would need is to shoot a little more video with him and have him help promote it via his twitter account @PhilBaroni.

Did you only promote it over twitter, or did you do it over Facebook or any other sort social media as well? It seemed to be a pretty big deal in the MMA world.

We did a little bit of promoting on Facebook and the UG but ultimately we really wanted to catch Dana’s eye with our efforts. Having him notice us was crucial to our campaigns success. Twitter was our primary route because you can connect directly with people instantly and that’s where Dana hangs out the most.

Only a few days ago, Dana let every know that Phil would be a part of the live broadcast on the prelims. How did it feel to know that something you did made a difference on such a huge scale? Not many people can say they’d done that before?

It was extremely rewarding, a dream come true. I called the boys as soon as news hit the wire and we were all going bananas w excitement. As it turned out, the reason Phil’s fight wasn’t going to be televised was the UFC and SpikeTV were in the process of re-negotiating contracts. Dana White actually flexed his muscle and found another network to air Phil’s fight due to the overwhelming support we were able to cultivate on Twitter. Dana truly cares about his fans.

Will Phil be coming out to one of the songs from the album and if so, which song and why?

Although Phil’s fight will be televised, it happens to be on the prelim card so guys don’t get walkout songs or entrances due to time constraints. However that will all change after Phil’s victory on New Year’s Day at UFC 125. Rest assured the next time the NYBA fights for UFC it will be on the main card, and he’ll be walking out to CFM.


Anyone you’d like thank for help with the twitter campaign?

Yes certainly! First of all CFM wants to thank all the hardcore MMA fans on twitter, @PhilBaroni for taken a chance with us. Travis @MMAScrapsRadio for all his support. Mike @MMABeatDown Radio in New York for heavily promoting the campaign, Zara @HaloPR for getting the whole UKMMA scene behind us. MMAJunkie.com @MMAUKBLOG and @WrestlingThumb for the headlines/press support. And last but not least @UFC and @DanaWhite for hearing all the fans out and co-signing on the whole thing/making it official.

 

Interview With Grudge Training Center Head Coach, Trevor Wittman

Many fight fans only focus on the fighters in MMA, neglecting the hard work that their coaches put to get them in prime condition for every fight that they have. One of the MMA’s best striking coaches, Trevor Wittman is notourious for his friendly attitude, yet he’s helped train some of the sports best fighters, such as Georges St Pierre, Rashad Evans, Shane Carwin, Duane Ludwig and Brendan Schaub to name a few.

MMA UK spoke to Wittman on a number of topics, including how he got into the sport, his best moments as a coach, training Shane Carwin and the fighters at his gym that we should all look out for in the future.

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for taking the time to do the interview Mr Wittman, how was your time in Germany?

It was good

For those that don’t know much about you, how did you get your start in the fight game?

My first Martial Art was Kenpo Karate, and then I went to Boxing

What was the first MMA fight that you ever saw and what was your opinion on the level of striking?

Royce Gracie vs. Dan Severn, and the striking was low level!!

You created the Grudge Training Center and you’ve now got an incredibly strong team. Who were the first few fighters at the gym and how much improvement did they need?

Duane Ludwig was my first MMA fighter and his striking was already at a high level. My first MMA fight was Duane Ludwig vs. Jens Pulver

You’ve trained some of the best fighters in MMA, resulting in some of the best fights ever. We’ll start off with Rashad Evan’s knockout of Chuck Liddell. Was that a punch that came out of nowhere or was there something you and your assistants noticed that you thought Rashad could capitalize on?

Actually, Mike Wynklejon was the one calling for the over hand in that fight, and it sure paid off!!

That knockout won “Knockout of the Year” by Sherdog. Was that the best knockout you’ve ever witnessed from one of the members of your team?

It was defiantly in the top three for sure, and from the profile of the fight yes probably #1!!!

What was the game-plan when Rashad was facing Forrest Griffin, who is an aggressive and unorthodox striker?

To let Forest close the gap, usually the shorter fighter goes after the taller fighter but in this fight we knew Forest would over commit and close the gap for us because of his aggressive style…

What was your first experience training Shane Carwin?

When I first trained Carwin we worked on some jump roping techniques and every new technique I threw at him he accomplished it with ease. He jump roped like he was 150lbs. I knew I had something special with his athleticism, and his size…

No-one can doubt that Carwin has knockout power, but we’ve seen him improve leaps and bounds in all of his fights. What aspects of his striking do you feel Carwin has most improved upon?

Becoming more fluid with his striking. All of Carwin’s fights to me he looked tense and anxious, but in the Mir fight and the Lesnar fight he started showing how fluid his striking can be.. For instance in the Brock fight when Shane deflected Lesnars Cross and then returned with right cross-left uppercut combination. It is nice to see a big parring a punch to set up offense, (offense with defense)!

Nate Marquardt lost to Yushin Okami at UFC 122 and we heard you tell Marquardt to believe in his feet. Why did you feel Nate’s kicks would help him win the fight?

We worked on throwing the head kick as Okami was in the exchange because Okami does not bring his hands back to his face in the middle of his combinations. Okami fights at a good range so it is hard to punch with him, so we felt the kick would get to its target… He (Marquardt) was just not able to release it…

As an affiliate of Greg Jackson’s camp, how difficult is it to create game-plans when your partner is so far away and fighters are going back and forth? Many would presume that both of you guys are racking up the air miles.

We are constantly on the phone with each other, the bestest of friends!!

You were a trainer on TUF 10. How that experience and what was it like training some of the fighters who were rough around the edges?

It was a great experience, I enjoyed every minute of it. Even the guys who seemed rough around the edges made good effort on learning and letting us the coaches take control..

One of the things that I vividly remember from the show was you telling Roy Nelson “Do you want to get knocked out again?” Was it hard to motivate Nelson during training?

After that conversation he was easy to work with, I believe that was his motivation. Sometimes you need to get under your fighters skin to wake them up…

One part of your job is the physical aspect, but another aspect is the mental side, which we only get a glimpse at during intervals in fights.  What are the types of things you say to your strikers to get them pumped?

Every fighter is different, some need Motivation, some need to be lectured like Nelson and some need to visualize the target, and some need to be humbled, but every fighter is a different machine and that is the part I love to figure out… I love getting into the mind of a champion, because champions are very unique people…

 Music keeps fighters motivated. What type of music do you guys play at Grudge?

We play such a variety of music in the gym it would be hard to name. Reggae, hip hop and rock are the most chosen, but I couldn’t name the songs, lol

One of the things that a few of us have noticed is that you’re very “happy” when you’re behind your fighters and you always throw your fist in the air. What makes you so happy when you’re cage side?

My smile is my confidence and, my excitement that I am at the point of sitting in the best seat in the house to watch my athlete perform, by far the best thing front row to the best sport!!! I also throw up an L with my fist, for LOVE to my lovely wife and kids at home who are my #1 fans…

 

As an MMA fan and someone who has seen hundreds of fights, who is your favourite striker to watch and which fighter do you think is the most underrated striker in MMA?

 I love to watch GSP, Man I love Jabs when they are thrown correctly!!

Are there any up and coming fighters that you’ve been really impressed with at the gym?

Yes, Justin Salas who is a 155 who has been with us for about a year, who will be making some waves and then Chaun Simms one of our 185lbs, boy these guys are good!!

Lastly, you were nominated for an MMA UK award. Anything you’d like to say to the fans?

 I appreciate all the fans of MMA, It is an honor to be nominated, but I feel there are two people that make this sport, the great FIGHTERS who entertain us with their fights, and the FANS who have grown this sport to the fastest growing sport in the world. I appreciate each every single fan whether you’re a fan of me or my fighters, or not. Again, the FANS are the ones responsible for supporting this great sport I LOVE

Thanks so much for your time, Trevor.  Is there anyone you’d like to thank?

 Thanks for the opportunity for this interview, and Thanks to my Brother Trent for being by my side from the beginning, and thanks to Alchemist for everything they do for me and the fighters they represent, Thanks 1-HIT…

MMA UK Interviews, Gray “The Bully” Maynard

If you’ve been following MMA UK since the beginning then you’ll know that one of our first HUGE interviews was with Gray Maynard.

The last time we spoke, Gray was going into his fight with Kenny Florian, a fight which would determine the next person to face Frankie Edgar. Maynard came out on top that night, convincingly beating Florian for three rounds using his crisp boxing and vicious ground and pound.

 

Maynard now faces Frankie “The Answer” Edgar, the man who beat BJ Penn twice, UFC 125. Maynard already has a win over Frankie, but both fighters have improved significantly since their last fight and this looks as if it will be an all out war between two of the worlds top lightweight fighters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congratulations on your last win against Kenny Florian, what was the game plan going into that fight?

He’s a good southpaw, counter puncher with good top game jiu-jitsu, so I didn’t want to rush in or chase him. I wanted to control him on the ground and not give him a chance to get on top where he is strong.

 

 

Knowing that Florian has some of the best strikes in the lightweight division, many people were impressed with the fact that you stood up with for long periods of the fight.  Were you intimidated by his Muay Thai at all

No, not all. He’s the 5th southpaw that I’ve fought in a row. I think he gets away with basic things that a southpaw does cause many of the guys he goes against don’t know what to do when fighting a southpaw. I spar with a lot of high level boxers, so I’m confident in my stand up game.

 

Florian struggled with fighting against you from his back. Was it as easy as it seemed on TV or was he as difficult as you assumed he would be?

Like I said before, his top game seemed to be better than his bottom game from the tapes I watched. But, was crafty on bottom and threw some short elbows that were surprisingly effective. It’s never easy, but when you’re prepared there shouldn’t be too many problems.

 

You and Frankie have both grown as fighters since you last fought. After seeing his last two fights against BJ Penn, what would you say are his weaknesses as you seemed to be the only fighter in the Lightweight division who has the key to beating Edgar?

I think he’s a great fighter. I just believe I’m better.

 

 

What type of fighters have you used in your training camp to try and mimic the style of Edgar?

I live in the fight capitol of the world, so it’s not hard to get guys to train with that have similar styles. I did bring in Jamill Kelly, he was a 2004 Olympic Silver medalist in wrestling. He’s been a great asset in keep my wrestling skills top notch.

 

 

Considering wrestling has once again entered an era of dominance on the MMA scene not seen since the old days of Hughes, Ortiz and Kerr, how does you see the sport evolving next?

I see the gaps closing between all the fighters. So the little details are going to matter the most in all areas of the fight.

 

Obviously the UFC-WEC merger was big news this year and was probably even bigger news for you. The lightweight division is incredibly stacked now. As a competitor, how exciting was it to know that more fighters were coming in?

I love to compete against the top competition, so it works out perfectly for me!

 

 

With the winner of Pettis and Henderson set to face the winner of you and Edgar, which of the two WEC fighters do you think you match up well against?

I just let that play out however it goes and focus on beating Edgar. I don’t look at any fight, but the one I have in front of me.

 

After Nick Diaz’s last win, he mentioned you and some other lightweights in his discussion with Joe Rogan and that he’d like to fight you again. How do you feel about that, considering the last round of you two fighting was a straight-up brawl. Some would assume that you two don’t like each other much?

I can’t speak for Nate, but I just look at it as business. I really don’t think about it, again right now all my attention is on Frank Edgar.

 

 

Any predictions for your fight against Edgar?

Me being 110% Jan 1st, getting a great win and a UFC belt

 

 

Thanks for your time Gray, anyone you’d like to thank?

Dethrone, HiTech Pharmaceuticals, Xtreme Couture, Xcap, my family, friends, and fans! Also check out http://www.graymaynard.com the only place to buy the new “Bully Brand” T shirt!

MMA UK interview’s Coalition Fight Music

I suppose it would be safe to say that Coalition Fight Music are the “Forefathers of Fight Music”. Mixing heavy hip hop beats with MMA based lyrics could be a tricky task, but these guys do it perfectly. As the sport grows bigger, more people will hear their music and understand the passion that they have for their craft and the idea around the music they make. MMA UK did an interview with Statecyde from the group about his influences, their theme song for Nick “Headhunter” Chapman and how the got the Coalition was formed…

Thanks for taking time out your schedule to talk to us at MMA UK Tony. First question, how did you get into music?

I was raised by a single mother who was always in the record shop. She always had all the new pop songs on vinyl/cassette and would play them in the car, on the way to school, at home etc. I guess her passion for music rubbed off on me.

You’ve definitely got some awesome rhymes, what types of MC’s were you influence by?

  Thanks mate, that’s a really tough question. I was always influenced by MC’s that were story tellers. Tupac, Biggie, The GZA, Outkast, DMX, Eminem and even Devlin a bit.

  

What was the first MMA fight you saw and what sort of impact did it have on you and the rest of your crew?

Well I had seen the UFC since its first PPV but it was a lot different back then obviously. When I started to become really interested in the sport was after I watched PrideFC. All the legends, Wandy, CroCop, Fedor, Gomi, Rampage… that’s what got me back into the sport religiously. I would have parties and throw on MMA DVD’s and everybody started noticing.

How did you and the rest of the Coalition Fight Music crew get together and where did you get the idea from?

I’ve known The Relles forever, we all grew up together. We were all music junkies and had been working on our own solo projects/careers trying to get signed like everyone else when we thought to ourselves, “Why not form a coalition and focus our efforts?” 

What was the process of making the album like for you guys?

  It has been a real labour of love. We wanted to make an album where every song was designed to be a “single”. We are very proud of the outcome and how the album sounds as a whole.

Considering the fact that you guys are artists, was it difficult only having lyrics that reference MMA or was it an advantage?

  That’s a great question. Believe it or not there are a lot of parallels between the fight business and the music business. It’s a real fight for independent musicians to make great music, and then to get the music played or noticed. Then there’s all the competition chasing the same dime, it can be very rough. You really have to have a lot of heart to have a shot just like fighting. Since we (CFM) all have that fighter spirit/mentality it just came very naturally.

You’ve got Phil Baroni on the album. What is he actually doing and how did that all get hooked up?

 

  First of all Phil is a legend and a super, great guy. We came up with a skit called “What would you do?” Where we’d all ask each other what would we do if we were in various places/circumstances where standing there was “None other than… Phil Baroni. I wound up calling a famous MMA radio show in the states called MMAScraps Radio and pranked UFC Heavyweight fighter Pat HD Barry and Tapoutscrape from Tapout. The host of the show Travis posted a video clip the band put to the audio (as a sort of viral) on the UG http://www.mixedmartialarts.com and within hours the video had received over 2,000 hits. Even Phil Baroni commented on the forum. After that we hooked up on twitter and went to visit him at AKA (American Kickboxing Academy) to hang out a bit, do lunch and stuff. We asked Phil if he wanted to be on the album and he was like, “I’m down”. 

How did you get hooked up with Nick “Headhunter” Chapman and what was it like writing a song that was going to be used by a British Fighter?

  I wound up meeting a super publicist named Zara who has a PR firm in London called HaloPR. She represents Nick as well as several other big name fighters in the US/UK. I have always been quite the anglophile and very fond of UK boxers like Prince Naseem Hamed/Lennox Lewis. I’ve also followed the UK grime/garage music scene so reaching out to a British fighter and having him coming out to our tune is major. Also, big ups to the BBC 1xtra’s Charlie Sloth, he’s been very supportive of Nicks tune.

Where can the fans download the song from?

  Anyone can check the song out at iTunes. Just type “HeadHunter” in the search box and it’ll come right up.

You’ve got an awesome video with Pat Barry for one of your songs, how did you guys manage to hook up with him?

  Pat is another remarkable fighter and person. I actually hit him up on twitter right before his fight and told him he was going to get the KO of The Night bonus. Low and behold, he wound up getting the victory that night and the bonus. After his fight we hooked up on a MMA radio show, cut him the track and have been cool every since

 

You guys are pretty well known amongst MMA fans and with MMA quickly being pushed into popular culture, do you see the crew only getting bigger from there?

 Yes certainly! As big as MMA is now both in the US and the UK, it’s still in its infancy. We’re just noticing the tip of the iceberg and we’ve got a whole generation of kids growing up watching and learning MMA. Not just learning one discipline like boxing/wrestling/jiu-jitsu or cross training but actually learning all the techniques simultaneously. The International talent pool is endless and the sky’s the limit. MMA’s best days are certainly still ahead.

Tony, thanks so much for your time. Where can the fans download the album from?

Thank you for the time bro, everyone can download the album off our official website http://www.coalitionfightmusic.com for free the first week. After that it’ll be available for download on iTunes/AmazonMP3/Rhapsody/Zune ect…

Anyone you’d like to thank?

 Coalition Fight Music would like to thank UCMMA and Zara at HaloPR as well as all of the UK MMA fight fans.

MMA Heat Video With Rich Franklin

Awesome interview with one of the all time greats in MMA

MMA UK Awards Spotlight: The UK’s new breakout star, Cory Tait

As MMA grows in the UK, new talent is popping up everyday and one of the UK’s breakout stars of the year is Cory Tait. At 22 years old, Tait stepped into the cage at UCMMA 16 for his first professional bout, against a much more experienced fighter in Dino Gambatesa. What we witnessed that night, was arguably one of the best knockouts of the year and the possible making of a star. Cory was nominated for a MMA UK award and is currently gearing up to fight Giorgio Andrews at UCMMA 18 for the vacant UCMMA featherweight title. MMA UK did an interview with him discussing how he got into the sport, what fighters he admires and the knockout heard around Britain.

Congratulations on being nominated for the MMA UK “Knockout of the Year” and “Breakout Fighter of the Year”. How are you feeling?

I’m feeling great, man. It just goes to show that with one big fight on the big stage, everything can change. It’s crazy how quickly things are moving, but I’m enjoying it

How’d you get into MMA?

I’ve been doing for years, ever since I was little. I started with Taekwondo and it was a natural transition into the sport of MMA. I met my trainer when I was 11 and he comes from a no-holds barred sort of style and it rubbed off on me.

 

What was your first fight you saw?

I honestly don’t even remember who I saw fighting when I saw my first fight. What I do remember is that I was watching two guys beat the crap out of each other and thinking it was awesome. I never really thought I’d get into the sport myself, but here I am.

What fight camp do you fight out of

I fight out of Gintas CSD. It’s pretty funny, but no-one could actually say the name properly. I heard someone trying to announce the name before and they completely messed it up. So we decided to just keep it as Gintas CSD. Much easier to remember!

 

In your last fight against Dino Gambatesa, you gave him a kick he’ll probably never forget. How was that moment for you?

It was awesome, kind of surreal though. Someone mentioned to me that he might have damaged his knee, the way he landed. Sort of like the way Cro Cop landed after Gonzaga hit him. It’s all part of the job, but I realise that it could be me one day and I could be in a worse situation, so I don’t let it get to my head.

What made you throw that kick? It’s rarely ever seen in MMA.

When you’re sparring or fighting, there’s like a language to it. You’re trying to guess your opponents moves and he’s trying to guess mine. Basically, I didn’t really think about it, it just happened. I didn’t even think it was going to knock him out, I thought he’d just be stunned. That’s why when he fell forward; I thought he was going to attack me. Once the referee pushed me off, I realised that it was over.

 

Congratulations on being nominated for the MMA UK “Knockout of the Year” and “Breakout Fighter of the Year”. How are you feeling?

I’m feeling great, man. It just goes to show that with one big fight on the big stage, everything can change. It’s crazy how quickly things are moving, but I’m enjoying it

How’d you get into MMA?

I’ve been doing for years, ever since I was little. I started with tae-kwon-do and it was a natural transition into the sport. I met my trainer when I was 11 and he comes from a no-holds barred sort of style and it rubbed off on me.

 

What was your first fight you saw?

I honestly don’t even remember who I saw fighting when I saw my first fight. What I do remember is that I was watching two guys beat the crap out of each other and thinking it was awesome. I never really thought I’d get into the sport myself, but here I am.

What fight camp do you fight out of

I fight out of Gintas CSD. It’s pretty funny, but no-one could actually say the name properly. I heard some try and announce the name before and they completely messed it up. So we decided to just keep it as Gintas CSD. Much easier to remember!

In your last fight against Dino Gambatesa, you gave him a kick he’ll probably never forget. How was that moment for you?

It was awesome, kind of surreal though. Someone mentioned to me that he might have damaged his knee, the way he landed. Sort of like the way Cro Cop landed after Gonzaga hit him. It’s all part of the job, but I realise that it could be me one day and I could be in a worse situation, so I don’t let it get to my head.

What made you throw that kick? It’s rarely ever seen in MMA.

When you’re sparring or fighting, there’s like a language to it. You’re trying to guess your opponents moves and he’s trying to guess mine. Basically, I didn’t really think about it, it just happened. I didn’t even think it was going to knock him out, I thought he’d just be stunned. That’s why when he fell forward; I thought he was going to attack me. Once the referee pushed me off, I realised that it was over.

 

Have you seen any of Giorgio Andrews fight?

I’ve seen two of his fights, but I try not to watch any of my opponents fights. They’re always improving and getting better, so if I expect what I see on tape, then I’m probably going to be surprised. I try to leave the tape-watching to my trainers, so they can pick a game plan for me.

How do you think Andrews is going to attack you and how do you intend to stop it?

Well I know he’s a strong fighter, who likes to take his opponents down to the ground, dish out some heavy ground and pound and then submit them. I think that’s what he usually does in his fights, but as you saw in my fight, if you take me down I’ll get right back up. He’s going to have a hard time keeping me down.

What type of fighters do you admire, because you’ve got a pretty interesting style?

My favourite fighters are obviously my trainer, Fedor Emilieanenko, Anderson Silva. When Shogun is healthy he’s awesome as well

I like them for their different attributes and ferociousness. If you take a bit from all of them, then you can be even better than them. I try to take elements of their game and some of their best qualities and mould it into my own style.

Have you seen any of Giorgio Andrews fight?

I’ve seen two of his fights, but I try not to watch any of my opponents fights. They’re always improving and getting better, so if I expect what I see on tape, then I’m probably going to be surprised. I try to leave the tape-watching to my trainers, so they can pick a game plan for me.

How do you think Andrews is going to attack you and how do you intend to stop it?

Well I know he’s a strong fighter, who likes to take his opponents down to the ground, dish out some heavy ground and pound and then submit them. I think that’s what he usually does in his fights, but as you saw in my fight, if you take me down I’ll get right back up. He’s going to have a hard time keeping me down.

What type of fighters do you admire, because you’ve got a pretty interesting style?

My favourite fighters are obviously my trainer, Fedor Emilieanenko, Anderson Silva. When Shogun is healthy he’s awesome as well

I like them for their different attributes and ferociousness. If you take a bit from all of them, then you can be even better than them. I try to take elements of their game and some of their best qualities and mould it into my own style.

 The UFC and WEC have now merged and I’ve got to ask how you feel about that and whether or not you see yourself there sooner or later?

I’m trying to get into the UFC, that’s no secret. It’s a dream of mine to fight their. It’s crazy as I’ve had some great luck recently. I signed on for my first professional fight, had a great knockout against Dino, then litreally two weeks later, the UFC and WEC merge together. It’s my ultimate goal. Hopefully, with a few more fights under my belt, I can get over there and turn a corner in my career.

Thanks for your time Cory. Is there anyone you’d like to thank?

I’d like to thank my coach and friend Gintas. My training partner’s Paul Steyne and John Wainwright, all my friends that come and support me, my family, friends and Ultimate Challenge.